Thursday, 29 October 2020

www.doverforum.com/sea-news
Sea Pictures from Dover

See the OPEN LETTER from Port of Dover CEO Doug Bannister just below....

For Safety Sake : Not a sea to cross in a small boat......


Lighthouse on Admiralty Pier, rough day Dover.



The Disney Magic setting off on a Channel run in the recent gloom....

The Disney Magic

Moving the Disney Magic away from the new pier above just as night falls
...storm on its way...moving her to settle more securely on the eastern arm Port of Dover.

The Disney Wonder

Another picture above of the Disney Wonder departing Dover... since this pic was taken the Disney Magic has returned.


Big menacing sky at Dover above but the sea was still tranquil...for that moment anyway, but it didnt last.....


The Disney Wonder departs Dover...


The Disney Wonder:

We had the magnificent Disney Magic with us here in the Port of Dover for such a long time until she left a few weeks ago....but now as if by wondrous magic, up pops another Disney,
The Disney Wonder...and you can see her pictured above there. Also in shot...survey boat Diana.


OPEN LETTER FROM DOUG BANNISTER, CEO, PORT OF DOVER




Dover is the right choice for business and consumers now more than ever



The United Kingdom Major Ports Group (‘UKMPG’) has issued a ‘briefing paper’ intended to encourage businesses to transfer cargo away from the Short Straits, the UK’s most vital link to European markets.

The paper points out that the Short Straits, which includes ferry links between Dover and Calais, as well as the Channel Tunnel, has a 60% market share of ‘British-Continental EU trade’. The Short Straits has achieved this market share because it is the right choice for business. Indeed, the paper acknowledges that the routes businesses use today are the right ones and the reason businesses choose the Short Straits is simple; it offers the most time efficient, cost effective and resilient access to international markets, delivering an estimated £3 billion saving for British businesses and consumers compared to alternative routes.

Our own independent analysis (Oxera 2018) has previously suggested that it would cost around £2.7 billion to take just 20% of our existing traffic in order to pay for new ferries operating on longer and slower routes. Importantly, these new ferries do not exist today and need to be built. With shipyard capacities and construction lead times, delivering such a fleet of new ferries holds significant lead time.

The UKMPG paper suggests that other ports might have capacity to take up to 60% of Short Straits traffic now, but acknowledges that this requires both Government and trader support for this offer of ‘resilience’ to be possible. Exponentially, this suggests that the cost to businesses and ultimately the consumer could be up to around £8 billion.

For Port of Dover, when looking at the overall UK Trade Resilience we take a systemic view – across ports, vessels, capacities, frequencies, operating models and traffic management schemes. To focus only on port capacity is terribly one-dimensional.

The geographic advantage that Port of Dover holds with the UK’s largest trading partner means that a single vessel can complete up to five round voyages in a single day, making our ferries hugely productive assets. Further, our operating model delivers an average inbound dwell time at our port of just five minutes, providing unparalleled port efficiency.

Other operating models, for example containers and unaccompanied trailers may have inbound dwell times from several hours to even several days, adding inefficiency to the system-wide supply chains. For those routes with longer sea voyages, a single vessel may only make a single round voyage in a day – meaning to replicate the capacities and frequencies offered via Port of Dover would require five times as many vessels.


The UKMPG paper admits that a ‘short term’ constraint might be the availability of additional ferries to handle the trucks being encouraged to divert to other routes, whilst also citing wider capacity issues on the southern North Sea corridor.

The report is right to focus on resilience as we approach the end of the Transition Period, but what resilience do you have if you are sending traffic to ports where the ferries do not exist? Neither is that a quick fix. The market dynamic is important here. In fact, rather than investing in new ferries, operators at some of the alternative ports have actually been closing these longer routes with tonnage moving back to the short routes as that is what the market wants – Dover has of course kept going throughout the pandemic. This dynamic applies to the European side too, with the majority of freight vehicles choosing to route through northern France to Calais and Dunkirk as it is simply closest.

All EU-facing UK ports will be under the same rules – there will be a standard process and transaction applied everywhere. We know from examples elsewhere, such as ‘Operation Wellington’ on the Humber, which anticipates using parts of the M62 and M180 as holding areas for HGVs, that if there is disruption it will be everywhere. The report itself admits that there is already a risk of disruption at these alternative ports due to new systems for HGVs. Therefore, on top of this, sending more traffic to ports that do not even have the ferry capacity will make the situation far worse and create far less resilience for UK trade.

In contrast, the traffic management regimes for the Short Straits are tested and proven – in short, we know they work. For example, the recent national security operation that affected all ports with additional screening and searches left around 4,500 lorries in Operation Stack. When the security operation ended, Dover had cleared all queuing traffic and was back to normal operations within just 12 hours. Nowhere else could do that. It would take weeks with the current vessel capacities and frequencies available elsewhere. For UK trade resilience, supply chains must have the confidence in managing periods of disruption, and crucially recovery and restoration of normal flows as swiftly as possible – both areas in which Port of Dover has excellent credentials.

As we all navigate the massive economic difficulties caused by COVID, and the uncertainties as we approach the End of Transition, it is right to showcase the incredible efforts of the maritime sector, and the excellent ports that we have across the nation towards ensuring supply chains are robust and functioning well.


Come what may, we will keep working to keep the nation supplied with the essential goods people need at this difficult time and give all businesses wherever they are the benefits of Dover’s unrivalled service. This is what we do all day, every day.

Indeed, as the Maritime Minister said on a panel discussion with us only the other day regarding the national trade network; ‘you have to have goods and people moving around freely. So if you are to have parts moving quickly and efficiently across the Channel, and through Dover, and through the country, you have a much easier opportunity for companies that might exist in the Midlands or in the North to get involved in whatever that industry is.’


The report says that the UK has not always been reliant on the Short Straits, harking back to pre-Single Market days. Equally, the UK has not always been reliant on the internet and same day/next day/just-in-time deliveries, but it is now.

A vision that takes the UK backwards is not the vision of the future we want to see. We need one that backs consumers and businesses everywhere for the challenges and opportunities ahead of us. We feel that we should celebrate our impressive, modern and efficient supply chains across all ports and modes throughout the nation.

For Dover, we fully appreciate the essential role that we conduct for the nation, and will continue to take our responsibility with all of the due care and attention the British people would expect of us, which is why Dover will remain the clear market choice.


Doug Bannister, CEO Port of Dover.


ENDS

ITALIA STREAM

Italia Stream...regular reefer... seen here approaching the Port of Dover.



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Your Comments (Newest First):
 
Post 91
  howard mcsweeney, Dover
took these about half an hour ago, trying to work out what the orange/yellow ones are about as i don't remember seeing them before.




Friday, 20 September 2013 - 15:19
 
Post 90
  Ed Connell, Dover
German Brandenburg class frigate Mecklenburg-Vorpommern passing Dover this morning. Try saying Mecklenburg-Vorpommern after a few scoops of Schnapps.



Friday, 20 September 2013 - 12:41
 
Post 89
  howard mcsweeney, Dover
never a dull moment, every type of conceivable vessel in the last few posts and now we have the boom - not heard anything about a pollution scare so could be a dummy run .

Friday, 20 September 2013 - 09:55
 
Post 88
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)


I came across the above at the very last minute. It took place yesterday..time on the clock. To my surprise they had cast a boom across the water at the very western corner of the harbour. There was quite a considerable amount of personnel in place with a number of anti-pollution trucks there and so on. Whether it was a dummy run to see how they would handle such an emergency or whether there was actual pollution I know not. A boom in normal pollution situations is used of course to prevent the pollution from spreading further. As we say though it may all have been a test run. But here we are with the pictures anyway...we may find out more later. Everyone of course is very jittery about pollution these days so lets hope there wasn't a serious or real problem. This is the weekend of Beachwatch too...for all good marine conservationists and volunteers. More info on Beachwatch further down the page.

And now following on from Ed's picture below..here is a further picture of the Ovit, this time leaving late in the day yesterday in the miserable and rough conditions. Out into the open seas she goes. Both tugs gave her assistance.


Thanks for the feedback below Ed. I will direct Chris to it. Best if our top man technical guru Chris looks at it to see if there is a solution.


Friday, 20 September 2013 - 07:38
 
Post 87
  Ed Connell, Dover
This is the chemical carrier Ovit which was laid up on the Eastern Arm for a day or two and has now departed.

Paul/Chris: Tried to upload this several times before but the new Sea News format was not allowing it. Nothing to do with size, it is the same size as all the others I was trying to upload in the same comment. I reduce them all to 1024x768 and this one comes out at 278KB. The problem was that I uploaded several photos in one comment and then tried to upload several more photos in another comment following immediately afterwards. As they no longer have individual names as on the original thread, but just come up with a number such as IMAGE-1 then the next comment displays the IMAGE-1 from the previous comment instead of the new one which has just been uploaded but has the same name.



Friday, 20 September 2013 - 04:08
 
Post 86
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
Quite an exciting vessel of immense scale moved slowly down the channel last evening. It was a huge maintenance/crane platform called Hermod and yes it moved slowly and very carefully. In between pictures I managed to go to Tesco and back for the supply of pot noodles and it was still moving at gradual pace when I returned. That explains the difference in light and colours. It weighs more than 75,000 tons and had left Rotterdam heading south to a Spanish port I believe. To be ever so technical about it...'twas a whopper!Smiley

In the picture left above , taken from very very long distance, it is probably still technically in the North Sea. By the time I photographed it on the right above.. evening was drawing in and yours truly's Tesco trip had been completed, and the platform was moving slowly by Dover itself.
This shot above shows the wider view as she passes down the Channel just beyond Dover.

Below we have a last shot of the Astor taken in blazing afternoon light. The Astor left last night about 8pm and the Empress about 9pm. So as the evenings are dark now no prospect of pictures at that point.

Interesting pictures of the underside and thrusters of Dover Seaways there Ed.
The reason some pix are not coming out is possibly because they may be too large.
We have been ironing out small problemos. Nice one Howard.

Thursday, 19 September 2013 - 08:18
 
Post 85
  Ed Connell, Dover
Try again.

David Church dredging over remains of the removed blockship Spanish Prince.


Chemical carrier Ovit moored on Eastern Arm.
[IMAGE-11]

Thursday, 19 September 2013 - 01:04
 
Post 84
  Ed Connell, Dover
Ships in port in the last couple of days:

Braemar


Amadea


Astor


Empress


David Church dredging over the remains of the removed blockship Spanish Prince.
[IMAGE-10]

Chemical carrier Ovit moored on Eastern Arm.
[IMAGE-11]

Thursday, 19 September 2013 - 00:48
 
Post 83
  Ed Connell, Dover
Re the query about stern thrusters on the old Sea News thread. Here are some photos of the Dover Seaways including her previous incarnation as the Maersk Dover.

Stern thruster visible behind propeller tail shaft.


New propellers fitted later to reduce fuel consumption.


The three bow thrusters with the painted markings above.


Close-up of the bow thrusters being examined by the ship's captains.


Thursday, 19 September 2013 - 00:24
 
Post 82
  howard mcsweeney, dover


some great photos taken this morning, here is one taken from higher up.

Wednesday, 18 September 2013 - 19:20
 
Post 81
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
The tide has helped with the pictures here..bringing the striking Pullmantur Empress higher and better into camera view..



The Astor is also in, see the post below for picture of same and further info.


Wednesday, 18 September 2013 - 11:14
 
Post 79
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
New research from DFDS SEAWAYS shows that people in the South East of England have voted Meatloaf's classic 'Bat out of Hell' as the best summer driving tune for 2013. Despite some hot new releases making the top ten list, old classics have come out on top as the favourite songs to listen to while driving, beating off hits from Rhianna and One Direction.

The survey was conducted by award winning ferry operator DFDS Seaways, which has transported thousands of holidaymakers with their vehicles from the UK to Europe this summer.
If the truth be told, and not a lot of people know this...yours truly did a far bit of rockin and rollin to Bat out of Hell..indeed so. In the old days of course. Saw Meatloaf performing in London at least twice if memory serves. That terrific female he used to sing with used to give him hell in those songs I can tell you...
"stop right there !!"Smiley
And you can see why people even to this day like to blast it out. Great fun.
The picture above shows the DFDS Dunkerque Seaways coming into harbour. This is one of the ferries involved in Ed's story below.

And now calming down from all that a-rockin and a-boppin..two cruise liners in today.
One is the Pullmantur Empress..I dont think this one was scheduled so it took me by surprise,
and the Astor. And here is the Astor arriving a few minutes ago (7.40am approx) on a super calm sea.

Unable to get a good pic of the Empress at the moment, she's an interesting one.


Wednesday, 18 September 2013 - 07:45
 
Post 78
  Tom Austin, London, bright and cool, ever so cool...

Costa Concordia is successfully salvaged - in pictures

(http)://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2013/sep/17/costa-concordia-successfully-salvaged-in-pictures#/?picture=417495969&index=0

Raising Costa Concordia - timelapse video

(http)://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2013/sep/17/raising-costa-concordia-timelapse-video

Well done all. :)


Tuesday, 17 September 2013 - 13:48
 
Post 77
  ColetteB, Dover
Yes indeed PaulB, I'm a little late this time around, the weeks seem to fly by!

Not much of a week though for cruise ships in Dover, well the season is coming to an end so it's to be expected Smiley

Today as we can see from below the Beautiful Amadea is here with a PoC at CT2. I don't remember this one here before, if she was, it must be a while back but I'm sure one of the guys will enlighten us Smiley

Also the familiar Braemar is now at CT1, T/R.

Tomorrow, 18th September, the Astor cruises in for a PoC at CT2, she was last here in May.

No cruise ship then until Wednesday September 25th when the Carnival Legend arrives back at CT2, T/R for the last time this season Smiley

That's all for now folks Smiley

Ed, Awesome photos Smiley

Tuesday, 17 September 2013 - 09:49
 
Post 76
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
AUTUMN COLOURS OVER DOVER HARBOUR
The ships are just about catching the early light as they come into harbour these days now that Autumn is here. The days are truly getting shorter..with light coming off at each end. Today the newly arrived Amadea just caught the early light and posed for us under a blazing sky. Not a hugely familiar visitor but I seem to remember her from the past. She is a smaller ship but with a modern look. Now also arriving as we speak is the much travelled and familiar Braemar. See more info on the Braemar over the page. So another double header of ships today - plenty of visitors for the town again.

News is coming through that they have righted the once magnificent Costa Concordia..all 116,000 tons of her. That took some doing. Inch by inch they slowly slowly pulled her upright. I believe the process is called parbuckling and so far, according to one pundit on TV, the operation has cost in excess of half a Billion pounds. Some bill eh! But well done them for making spectacular progress.. I'm sure the vessel lying there on its side at Giglio must have given something of a bizarre tourism boost to the local economy. See also the posts below.

ColetteB if you are looking in dont forget your cruise listingSmiley
Still gobsmacked with those pix from Ed below. Have added a headline at top of page. Smiley


Tuesday, 17 September 2013 - 07:27
 
Post 75
  JanT, Dover
Crumbs Ed some great pictures there, it certainly looked like pretty hairy conditions. Smiley
also good to see you on sea news Tom.Smiley

Seeing the picture of Concordia it just shows us what a huge job it is to get it upright again.


Monday, 16 September 2013 - 15:33
 
Post 74
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
Wow! great set of pictures Ed...you were the man on the spot for real there. Yes indeed conditions were terrible late yesterday so a tough ask for all concerned. Really and bravely in the teeth of the gale there and no mistake. The pictures tell the story.

Smiley

Thanks for the info re Concordia Tom. All seems to be progressing there slowly.

Monday, 16 September 2013 - 14:53
 
Post 73
  Ed Connell, Dover

The Dover Seaways was involved in an incident at 1800 last night in the approaches to the Dunkerque West fairway. It was blowing a gale and raining heavily.

Dunkerque Seaways had just left Dunkerque West and reported seeing the kite from a kite surfer board in the water. The French rescue helicopter and lifeboat had been scrambled to investigate.

As we approached this area on the Dover Seaways, the navigator spotted a black shape in the water which could have been a person or body in a black wetsuit. We reversed course and cleared the fast rescue craft ready for launching.

As we came up to the object, the helicopter appeared with the lifeboat not far behind so it was unnecessary to chance launching our fast rescue craft in the prevailing conditions.

Here is a sequence of photos of the incident, unfortunately all rather blurry as taken in the driving rain, the latter four through the Bridge windows.

Helicopter passing along starboard side.


Diver descending from helicopter.


Diver ascending again after retrieving object.


Diver with object which transpired to be just a pair of chest waders!


Diver re-entering helicopter.


We were then released from standing-by and resumed our passage. The object in question was just a pair of chest waders probably lost overboard from a fishing boat. However, the incident was useful training for all concerned and went very smoothly.

Monday, 16 September 2013 - 12:47
 
Post 72
  Tom Austin, London, bright and cool, ever so cool...
This may be of interest to all you ex- and budding marine engineers...

"Costa Concordia: salvage teams attempt to right cruise ship - live updates"

(As well as textual live updates there is a live video feed.)

(http)://www.theguardian.com/global/2013/sep/16/concordia-salvage-operation-giglio-parbuckling-live-updates

The cranes are taking the strain as I type.

N.B.
Please remove the brackets around the 'http' of the web address. Smiley

Monday, 16 September 2013 - 10:20
 
Post 71
  PaulB, Dover (dover7@msn.com)
The big global sea news story today monday is the attempted salvage of the doomed Costa Concordia. The huge and spectacular cruise liner ran aground off the Italian coast in headline grabbing horror, packed as it was with passengers aplenty. Most managed to get off the ship and were rescued safely but 32 people died in dismal conditions. As we understand it only two people are missing, unaccounted for, and these are presumed to be somewhere onboard..lost in the vast bulk of the ship. The ship, according to Alan Johnston of the BBC, is the length of three football pitches and weighs twice as much as the Titanic. So it will be one heck of a job getting this one righted. It will never see service again of course.

As we are all very aware, the magnificent Costa cruise ships are regular visitors to us here in Dover. Only a few days ago the stunning Costa Pacifica was in harbour..pictures further down the page ( ah !...now on PAGE TWO ). But here we are today with a picture of the Costa Concordia lying on its side just off the Tuscan island of Giglio..good luck to the salvage people.


Monday, 16 September 2013 - 06:33
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