Friday, 27 November 2020


www.doverforum.com/sea-news
Sea Pictures from DOVER ....


See the OPEN LETTER from Port of Dover CEO Doug Bannister further below....


Border Force Vigilant seen here returning to the Port in the past few days...we believe the Border Force rib powering alongside contained some migrants as several incursions were reported on the day.


The Disney Magic resting tranquilly at new pier WD4 Port of Dover, the tranquility making a change from all the recent rough weather...while in the foreground the Harbour Patrol Boat meanders along keeping everything safe and secure... In the far distance you can just see the Vasco da Gama cruise ship heading for Portugal.

Below...the Sun Rising through the drizzle on the Dover Straits


Yes the Sun rising through the drizzle... it begins to climb over Calais...as we look across the ever busy Dover Straits.

This picture taken a few moments before the one above....

November Sky - Dover Seafront

Dover Seafront November:
Striking evening sky as we look along Dover Seafront at sundown.....



The Disney Wonder:
The Disney Wonder pulled away from Dover on the recent saturday heading for Funchal we understand...
.......a rough ol' trip in the prevailing conditions....



Dover Harbour: something of a rare site this...fog shimmering across the surface in this way, as shown above. Picture taken on a recent chilly but dazzlingly bright and sunlit morning.

" smoke on the water, fire in the sky "

DISNEY at DOVER

The Disney Wonder and the Disney Magic

If you quietly wish upon a star, hoping for even more wondrous magic in Dover,
...well you might just end up with two Disney's....


Fire on Western Heights


Something of a forced picture taken on friday night of the fire on Western Heights here in Dover. It seems a stray rogue firework caused it, setting scrubland alight. Four fire engines were in attendance we understand. The picture is of poor quality taken through the darkness, but it gives the general gist as we look across the rooftops.



Full Moon over Dover....

The 'Blue Moon' over the Port of Dover in recent times.
Look at that rugged terrain...

* *

OPEN LETTER FROM DOUG BANNISTER, CEO, PORT OF DOVER




Dover is the right choice for business and consumers now more than ever



The United Kingdom Major Ports Group (‘UKMPG’) has issued a ‘briefing paper’ intended to encourage businesses to transfer cargo away from the Short Straits, the UK’s most vital link to European markets.

The paper points out that the Short Straits, which includes ferry links between Dover and Calais, as well as the Channel Tunnel, has a 60% market share of ‘British-Continental EU trade’. The Short Straits has achieved this market share because it is the right choice for business. Indeed, the paper acknowledges that the routes businesses use today are the right ones and the reason businesses choose the Short Straits is simple; it offers the most time efficient, cost effective and resilient access to international markets, delivering an estimated £3 billion saving for British businesses and consumers compared to alternative routes.

Our own independent analysis (Oxera 2018) has previously suggested that it would cost around £2.7 billion to take just 20% of our existing traffic in order to pay for new ferries operating on longer and slower routes. Importantly, these new ferries do not exist today and need to be built. With shipyard capacities and construction lead times, delivering such a fleet of new ferries holds significant lead time.

The UKMPG paper suggests that other ports might have capacity to take up to 60% of Short Straits traffic now, but acknowledges that this requires both Government and trader support for this offer of ‘resilience’ to be possible. Exponentially, this suggests that the cost to businesses and ultimately the consumer could be up to around £8 billion.

For Port of Dover, when looking at the overall UK Trade Resilience we take a systemic view – across ports, vessels, capacities, frequencies, operating models and traffic management schemes. To focus only on port capacity is terribly one-dimensional.

The geographic advantage that Port of Dover holds with the UK’s largest trading partner means that a single vessel can complete up to five round voyages in a single day, making our ferries hugely productive assets. Further, our operating model delivers an average inbound dwell time at our port of just five minutes, providing unparalleled port efficiency.

Other operating models, for example containers and unaccompanied trailers may have inbound dwell times from several hours to even several days, adding inefficiency to the system-wide supply chains. For those routes with longer sea voyages, a single vessel may only make a single round voyage in a day – meaning to replicate the capacities and frequencies offered via Port of Dover would require five times as many vessels.


The UKMPG paper admits that a ‘short term’ constraint might be the availability of additional ferries to handle the trucks being encouraged to divert to other routes, whilst also citing wider capacity issues on the southern North Sea corridor.

The report is right to focus on resilience as we approach the end of the Transition Period, but what resilience do you have if you are sending traffic to ports where the ferries do not exist? Neither is that a quick fix. The market dynamic is important here. In fact, rather than investing in new ferries, operators at some of the alternative ports have actually been closing these longer routes with tonnage moving back to the short routes as that is what the market wants – Dover has of course kept going throughout the pandemic. This dynamic applies to the European side too, with the majority of freight vehicles choosing to route through northern France to Calais and Dunkirk as it is simply closest.

All EU-facing UK ports will be under the same rules – there will be a standard process and transaction applied everywhere. We know from examples elsewhere, such as ‘Operation Wellington’ on the Humber, which anticipates using parts of the M62 and M180 as holding areas for HGVs, that if there is disruption it will be everywhere. The report itself admits that there is already a risk of disruption at these alternative ports due to new systems for HGVs. Therefore, on top of this, sending more traffic to ports that do not even have the ferry capacity will make the situation far worse and create far less resilience for UK trade.

In contrast, the traffic management regimes for the Short Straits are tested and proven – in short, we know they work. For example, the recent national security operation that affected all ports with additional screening and searches left around 4,500 lorries in Operation Stack. When the security operation ended, Dover had cleared all queuing traffic and was back to normal operations within just 12 hours. Nowhere else could do that. It would take weeks with the current vessel capacities and frequencies available elsewhere. For UK trade resilience, supply chains must have the confidence in managing periods of disruption, and crucially recovery and restoration of normal flows as swiftly as possible – both areas in which Port of Dover has excellent credentials.

As we all navigate the massive economic difficulties caused by COVID, and the uncertainties as we approach the End of Transition, it is right to showcase the incredible efforts of the maritime sector, and the excellent ports that we have across the nation towards ensuring supply chains are robust and functioning well.


Come what may, we will keep working to keep the nation supplied with the essential goods people need at this difficult time and give all businesses wherever they are the benefits of Dover’s unrivalled service. This is what we do all day, every day.

Indeed, as the Maritime Minister said on a panel discussion with us only the other day regarding the national trade network; ‘you have to have goods and people moving around freely. So if you are to have parts moving quickly and efficiently across the Channel, and through Dover, and through the country, you have a much easier opportunity for companies that might exist in the Midlands or in the North to get involved in whatever that industry is.’


The report says that the UK has not always been reliant on the Short Straits, harking back to pre-Single Market days. Equally, the UK has not always been reliant on the internet and same day/next day/just-in-time deliveries, but it is now.

A vision that takes the UK backwards is not the vision of the future we want to see. We need one that backs consumers and businesses everywhere for the challenges and opportunities ahead of us. We feel that we should celebrate our impressive, modern and efficient supply chains across all ports and modes throughout the nation.

For Dover, we fully appreciate the essential role that we conduct for the nation, and will continue to take our responsibility with all of the due care and attention the British people would expect of us, which is why Dover will remain the clear market choice.


Doug Bannister, CEO Port of Dover.


ENDS


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Post 402
  PaulB, Dover
A cargo ship reportedly en route to Genoa in Italy was in collision with a tug and a smaller vessel it was towing at around 3am today saturday out in the channel. The collision resulted in serious damage to the smaller vessel, but no-one was injured in the incident which happened about nine miles off Dungeness in Kent.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) said: "The Dungeness lifeboat went out to the vessels and stood by to make sure everything was okay. The Dover lifeboat arrived to take over from their Dungeness colleagues, while a Trinity House vessel, Galatea, also attended to assess the situation."

Just goes to show how congested things are out there. The good news is..nobody appears to have been hurt.

Picture shows Trinity House vessel Galatea in Dover a while back.
Picture by MARTIN COLLINS.


Saturday, 11 January 2014 - 19:43
 
Post 401
  PaulB, Dover
Bit of a shock to see blinding sunlight after the terminal gloom and terrible turbulence of recent times, but yes indeed sunlight it is...here we see the Ivar Reefer heading out yesterday morning...bound for Antwerp. There seems to be great trade between us here and Antwerp, taking goods right into the heart of the European Union. Long may it all continue with Dover playing a big part. The picture doesn't show the ship terribly well but you get the idea..
Great set of pictures there below Ed of the Reachstacker in full operation. Must admit I had never seen one before, or never noticed them anyway, until I saw the beast growling its way down the seafront complete with police escort. Fabulous thing when you see it outside its normal environment. Excellent to see it in operation in those pictures below.

Yes it must have been very tough out there Ed in the atrocious weather. I never remember it being as bad...and I'm on dry land. Well done to all the guys out there who keep the ferries and the trade right on going.
Smiley

PS: just a reminder to all, if you fancy some time away see the current special offers. Le Touquet with MyFerry Link..details now on page 2
and the Ski Slopes with DFDS ..details a few posts below. Nice deals to enjoy.

Saturday, 11 January 2014 - 07:52
 
Post 400
  Ed Connell, Dover
Some photos of the Reachstacker doing what Reachstackers do best. Taken yesterday in unaccustomed sunshine. Thank God the weather has improved. I have been on the Dover Seaways since just before New Year and the weather has been unrelentingly abysmal.






Friday, 10 January 2014 - 10:31
 
Post 399
  PaulB, Dover
Nice and all as Dover Seafront is, even in winter, every now and then you need to get away. How about this idea for hitting the ski slopes from DFDS...


Smiley Set sail with DFDS Seaways for your 2014 snow break.
Book your return journey before 14 January to receive a free £20 onboard voucher
_________________________

Save with DFDS Seaways when heading to the slopes this winter by booking a return Dover-France ferry crossing, the easy and cost effective way to travel to your snowy adventure. When booked by 14 January, four people and a car can travel from as little as £29 each way and receive a free £20 voucher to spend in the onboard shop for travel up to the 2 April.

With no extra charge for taking your skis or snowboard, you can take as much luggage as you can fit in your car or roof rack and avoid the extra fees associated with air travel when heading off for your winter sports holiday.

With a variety of ski resorts within easy reach of Dunkirk or Calais, including Morzine, Tignes and Chamonix, it has never been easier to book your group or family ski trip to Europe this winter. If you book a return crossing before January 14, you’ll also receive a free £20 voucher to spend in the onboard shop, where you can stock up on ski and après ski essentials such as sun protection, sunglasses and beer, wine and spirits before you reach your chalet.

Apart from deciding what to spend your onboard voucher on, you’ll also find plenty of other ways to pass the time as you cruise across the Channel. You can enjoy a bite to eat in one of the onboard restaurants and cafés, or have a drink in the bar and admire the fantastic sea views. For little pirates there is a dedicated children’s play area, where they can let off steam before the onward journey.

Max Foster, passenger director at DFDS Seaways, says: “For those who want to head for the slopes this season, but don’t want the hassle of the long queues and baggage restrictions associated with air travel, I would encourage you to consider taking the easier car and ferry option. Travelling by ferry is not only a more relaxed way to travel, it is also very cost effective when travelling as a family or small group.”

DFDS Seaways sails up to 44 times a day between the Dover and France, with routes to both Dunkirk and Calais, providing passengers with flexible crossing times, a luxury on-board travel experience and convenient travel options.

To book now or to find out more information please visit www.dfds.co.uk or telephone 0871 5747235.

Some great places mentioned above there..ahhh Chamonix !
Picture above shows the Dieppe Seaways approaching the western exit/entrance.

* *
Well done with the pictures and info guys. learning more about the Reachstacker everyday. A fascinating machine. And also am very glad now we spotted the Admiral Kuznetsov moving by...probably heading to Sochi. Very impressive, as you can see in Howards picture there.

Smiley

Friday, 10 January 2014 - 07:59
 
Post 398
  Mike J., Dover
Just a Swing at Twilight . . . . [as the song almost goes]





Late afternoon sun catches the SPIRIT OF FRANCE as she swings to dock on No.9 berth on Thursday afternoon.

Thursday, 9 January 2014 - 23:51
 
Post 397
  John Mavin, Dover
Thanks for that Ray. Smiley

Thursday, 9 January 2014 - 21:26
 
Post 396
  Ray H, Dover
John, you probably saw one of the Harbour Mobile Cranes that work the ships on the cargo terminal being delivered,they were indeed delivered as deck cargo as you describe.
Both of the Reachstackers were delivered to the Eastern Docks by road on low loaders.
Ray.

Thursday, 9 January 2014 - 18:07
 
Post 395
  howard mcsweeney, Dover
interesting stuff all round, found this photo of the "admral kuznetsov" on manoeuvres.




Thursday, 9 January 2014 - 15:45
 
Post 394
  John Mavin, Dover
That Reachstacker ....... a few years ago I watched one being delivered to DHB (it could have been this one). It arrived as deck cargo on a small freighter which initially laid up on the Eastern Arm. The plan was to drive it off the ship on a perfectly horizontal line onto the Cargo Terminal (where the banana boats berth) - a tricky operation which could have been disastrous had it gone wrong.

Firstly, the conditions had to be just right, i.e. slack water at high tide and, secondly, there had to be no swell - this meant that all shipping movement in the port had to be suspended while offloading took place. A third consideration was that once the front wheels were on the quay the ship had to be trimmed to compensate for the weight loss.

As I recall the first planned attempt was abandoned because of the wind, but on the following day the conditions were perfect and the whole operation was carried out excellently.

Thursday, 9 January 2014 - 10:15
 
Post 393
  PaulB, Dover
Thanks for that info John, great stuff. Looks like its the Russian Navy for sure. The reason I suspected Russians earlier was a bit more than a wild guess as there were at the same time a gaggle of Russian cargo ships following along behind all at once..So I thought..eyupp..like ye do. Bit unusual.
The aircraft carrier was relatively close in to shore but the visibilty was not great.

Thursday, 9 January 2014 - 09:54
 
Post 392
  John Mavin, Dover
I'm fairly sure this is the Russian aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov, currently en route for deployment in the Med. Because of the weather she's been at anchor off Scotland for a few days.

Thursday, 9 January 2014 - 09:01
 
Post 391
  Mike J., Dover
PaulB - Aha ! So it turned off the seafront there & must have gone 'contraflow' to Eastern Docks along the dual carriageway bringing traffic there to a grinding halt for a short while.
Thanks !

Thursday, 9 January 2014 - 06:50
 
Post 390
  PaulB, Dover
Mike here's another picture for you to show the beasts exit route from the seafront. Must have been a tight squeeze as you say but it probably used pavement and all. To exit further down the seafront by the Premier Inn would probably have been too tight a squeeze. I suspect the average motorist would feel a tad menaced to see this thing approaching in the rear view mirror.
I'm sure I saw Charles Rolls turning his head there to have a look..Smiley

Yes indeed thanks again for all the info Ray..you certainly know your onions. The full frontal shot of it below coming down the seafront almost shows the thing breathing fire !!Smiley I'm not sure where it was heading but if I see it again will let everyone know.

Out in the Channel yesterday there appeared to be some heavy military hardware on the move. This looks like an aircraft carrier to me but as ever I cant be 100% certain as it didn't show up on our Channel Traffic thingy...which can be found on our overall merged frontpage ( at top of page dover.uk.com). It seemed to have a smaller ship as 'outrider' as well .. But here's the thing, it was shadowed further back by the Royal Navy, HMS Defender in fact, which did show up on the channel traffic device. Maybe they were shadowing Russians on the move...perhaps the cold war is still to some extent in operation or is my imagination running riot? Anyway here's the picture..


Thursday, 9 January 2014 - 06:32
 
Post 389
  Mike J., Dover
PaulB - thanks for the interesting photo of the beast heading along the seafront, heading presumably for Eastern Docks.

How did it get from Marine Parade onto Townwall Street ?
It sure as heck would have problems with the gap between the bollards.
I always breathe in to get my car thru the gap . . . .

Wednesday, 8 January 2014 - 15:21
 
Post 388
  JanT, Dover
Thank you for that imfo Ray as you can see by the picture, it certainly was not something you see everyday traveling down the seafront.Smiley

Mark and Vic glad to see you enjoy Sea News SmileySmiley

Wednesday, 8 January 2014 - 13:09
 
Post 387
  Ray H, Dover
You guess correctly, the machine is a SISU Reachstacker built in Finland for the express purpose of handling shipping containers. There are two of these wee beasties lurking around the Port somewhere, originally purchased by DHB then sold off to Hammonds some years back. It is good to see that they are still working they are built like the proverbial brick outhouse.
Ray.

Wednesday, 8 January 2014 - 08:53
 
Post 386
  PaulB, Dover
Thats a cracking picture there a couple of posts below from Stephen Walker. You can almost feel the moment and hear the roar of the sea. Ace pic Stephen..well done Howard getting it up. Great addition.

Vic you are right, its very tough for the guys out there on the sea in this weather, going through the thick and thin of it every day. Thanks again for your comments..glad you are enjoying the Sea News pages.

Hello Mark ..welcome. Good to hear from you all the way up there in Northants. Ah yes have often gazed at those local glorious gliders over that way on summer days..tranquil beauty in motion. You made us laugh about Brussels standardising the seagull.
Smiley

Look at this guy from yesterday...
This Monster Mover came grinding and growling down the seafront yesterday around 1pm. It had a police escort front and rear, because of its size no doubt. The front escort just out of shot. We are seeing an upsurge in monster movers lately and this is the latest. I dont know what it is...is it a container lifting crane or similar? Bit of a beast. Came close to crushing that blue car left like an elephant would a bug..Look at the size of those tyres.

SEAFRONT LIGHTS: Glad the guys at the Port noticed our comment mentioning that the very central light amongst the all new seafront lights wasn't working...the guys came to fix it late yesterday...and now we have the full set of new lights all glowing brightly along Dover Seafront...the new lights run from the Premier Inn to the Yacht Club. White light rather than orange light as we noted previously...and very nice too.

Wednesday, 8 January 2014 - 07:33
 
Post 385
  vic matcham, Dover
This is a very good site with some great photos of the sea and the port and the ships that come and vist us all the year round and in all weathers,I worked at sea off and on in ny working life on ships mainly welding ,just glad not out there this year,I was on a ship working in the 1987 storms but this time it has gone on for so many weeks and looks like no end to it yet,but the good news about it all it is keeping the snow away.Smiley

Wednesday, 8 January 2014 - 02:02
 
Post 384
  howard mcsweeney, dover
the photos get ever more dramatic - the cloud formation is a great one, this one was taken at the hoe last friday by stephen walker during a volunteer conservation day.




Tuesday, 7 January 2014 - 12:17
 
Post 383
  Mark Rushton, Northants (rushton.mark@hotmail.co.uk)
Hi Paul,

Great Blog - as someone who has an interest in the ferries and as a fairly regular visiting instructor at Channel Gliding Club just up the road I find it very enlightening. As regards your feathered friend, my money's on a cormorant (or possibly a sh*g, but that might not get past the lewdity filter....). Your comment implies that Brussels are now standardising the seagull, which, although disappointing, really doesn't come as that much of a surprise....

Cheers, Mark

Tuesday, 7 January 2014 - 12:02
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